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I guess nominating would be a cause for probation???

Tue, Mar 28 2023 8:04 AM (19 replies)
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  • pmm711
    5,538 Posts
    Fri, Mar 24 2023 9:27 AM

    Whew...no wonder the forum has died...

    Off hand I can think of a few nominees for 2023.  There's some Lifetime Achievement Awards in this category to handout too.  :-)

  • PureGro1
    1,656 Posts
    Fri, Mar 24 2023 10:06 AM

    pmm711:

    Whew...no wonder the forum has died...

     

    And yet the earth continues to spin just fine

     

  • pmm711
    5,538 Posts
    Fri, Mar 24 2023 11:01 AM

    PureGro1:

    pmm711:

    Whew...no wonder the forum has died...

    Excuse me PureGro...need to edit this for you...it should have read,

    "no wonder the worthwhile forum has died...

    PureGro1:

    And yet the earth continues to spin just fine

    The forum lives...just in a way most of us wish it didn't.  Not even a martini or two, along with an edible or opioid, makes it appear better than what it has become...unlike the 2am women at the local tappy.

  • PureGro1
    1,656 Posts
    Fri, Mar 24 2023 11:41 AM

    pmm711:
    The forum lives...just in a way most of us wish it didn't.

    True, and the highways were nicer before they became jammed with broken heroes on their last chance power drives too.

  • ct690911
    7,203 Posts
    Fri, Mar 24 2023 12:40 PM

    I dunno guys...many popular (and very bright) forum participants still post here. I have a few on my friend list and several more smart enough to not accept my invite...lol

    Seriously, read the posts from Alosso, or Sam Spayed, or Yiannis, or the peerless Scott Hope. Smart guys who post things which are on point.

    There are numerous others who make the forum worth reading and participating in.

    ...sayin'

    ct

  • pmm711
    5,538 Posts
    Fri, Mar 24 2023 7:45 PM

    ct690911:

    There are SOME others who make the forum worth reading and participating in.

    …sayin’

    Colin…I tweaked part of your comment (see above).  And yes, those few deserve huge accolades for their contributions to the forum.  They also call out those deserving of this award and whose brains are shrinking day by day, post by post.

    …sayin’

    👍🏻👍🏻

     

     

  • PureGro1
    1,656 Posts
    Sat, Mar 25 2023 6:27 AM

    pmm711:
    brains are shrinking day by day, post by post.

    You should really think about this...Or dont...lol

    Their is a cognitive tendency we share to selectively remember the past as better than it was, especially when the present doesn’t feel so good.

    There’s a common misconception that memories are accurate records of the past, pristinely preserved in a mental filing cabinet.

    “Memory doesn’t really work like that,” said Anne Wilson, a professor of psychology at Wilfrid Laurier University whose research broadly focuses on memory, time and identity. “We reconstruct what happened in the past on the basis of little bits and pieces of memory. We’re acting like archaeologists — picking up the pieces and putting them back together.”

    This doesn’t mean we consciously distort or embellish our memories. But the process of retrieving memories is “highly reconstructive and prone to various biases,” said Daniel Schacter, a professor of psychology at Harvard University and the author of “The Seven Sins of Memory: How the Mind Forgets and Remembers.”

    Then there’s the simple fact that most of us prefer reminiscing about positive experiences, which gives us “preferential access” to those memories, Dr. Schacter explained. In other words, aspects of the past that we enjoy thinking about tend to stick with us over time, while elements we don’t think about fade away. Researchers call this retrieval-induced forgetting. “This may contribute to a positive memory bias because we tend not to rehearse, rehash and retrieve negative experiences,” Dr. Schacter added. Traumatic memories, which are often intrusive and persistent, are the notable exception.

    we’re all primed with some degree of collective nostalgia as a baseline. “If we start out with the hypothesis that things were better in the past, then we’ll pull out memories to confirm that,” 

    Just because memories can change when we reconstruct them doesn’t necessarily mean all of them have changed significantly. But it does mean that they are still all shaped by various cognitive processes, including those meaningful moments, like holiday gatherings or trips.

    We’ve all felt it: The family vacation was full of arguments, sunburns and hangovers, but somehow you remember only the quality time, gorgeous weather and delicious meals.

    In 1994, two psychology researchers, Terence Mitchell and Leigh Thompson, sought to offer and test a theoretical model for this phenomenon, which they called “rosy retrospection.” In their paper, Dr. Mitchell and Dr. Thompson explained rosy retrospection as one of three ways our mind creates the effect of “rose-colored glasses.” First is rosy projection — the “great, positive anticipation” that often leads to “overblown expectations,” said Dr. Thompson, a professor at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management.

    Second, the researchers said, is the “dampening” of pleasure in the present: “We are hard-wired to give negative stimuli a lot more cognitive attention in the present,” Dr. Thompson said. But these details “disappear by the wayside in our memories.” The result? Rosy retrospection: recalling the past more fondly than we experienced it at the time.

    Multiple studies document rosy retrospection in action. A 1992 study found that visitors to Disneyland reported significantly more positive recollections of their trips than the details they reported during the trips themselves (like crying children or long lines).

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/02/smarter-living/why-we-romanticize-the-past.html

  • ct690911
    7,203 Posts
    Sat, Mar 25 2023 6:47 AM

    Good post Chris...very informative.

    I agree and always say that now is "the good old days".

    ps: I noticed you cited a Canadian professor..:)

    ct

  • PureGro1
    1,656 Posts
    Sat, Mar 25 2023 7:28 AM

    ct690911:

    always say that now is "the good old days".

    ps: I noticed you cited a Canadian professor..:)

    Im closer to canada than any other US state so I guess it stands to reason...lol

    It's easy to find problems and ways to separate people, we are from different countries, different races, religions, genders Etc... BUT we all come here because we all like this game or enjoy chatting about it or whatever- focusing on why we all connect vs looking for things we don't agree with leads to a happier life IMO.

     

  • SamSpayed
    4,917 Posts
    Sat, Mar 25 2023 7:45 PM

    ct690911:
    Good post Chris...very informative.

    Agreed.  Thanks for posting that, Chris.  It is gratifying to read something intelligent here in the Forums on occasion.

    I wonder, though, how much of what they call "rosy retrospection" is something that's influenced by a person's basic disposition.  I can imagine that people whose basic disposition is generally positive (the glass-half-full people) might tend to have a rosy retrospection when remembering the past, while those with a negative disposition (the Grumpy Cats of the world) might tend to remember the worst things.

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