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Using the Pitch/Chip shot mode - putting green grid.

Mon, Dec 29 2014 11:07 AM (95 replies)
  • tigerfan1506
    3,193 Posts
    Tue, Nov 26 2013 6:14 AM

    So on approach shots, each grid is a 20 ft square?

  • ithurtswnipee
    891 Posts
    Tue, Nov 26 2013 7:05 AM

    the grids on the green are 2 square feet no matter where you are. If you are out 10- 100 + feet you can activate your putter for a better look at what the green is like before you hit your approach shot.

    Hope this helps

    Pee

  • AeriesTakaaki
    83 Posts
    Tue, Nov 26 2013 7:37 AM

    Sorry I'm a bit confused how do you   move the grid so the ball and the hole are in the same column.

    Thank You


  • ApexPC
    3,164 Posts
    Tue, Nov 26 2013 10:08 AM

    DaddysKat:

    ApexPC:
    A quartering wind that is 45° (+ or -) use a factor of 0.7.

    Using the Sine function with radians, I come up with .70883 with 12 MPH winds when you're at 45, 135, 225 and 215 degrees (or 8.5 MPH of actual wind force on the ball).  So we're really close ... my question is where did the 1' per 100' of distance (or 1%) come from?  Was it a WAG?  (as my Physics instructor loved to call it) 

    No offense ... can you provide a bit of detail to show how you came up with the 1' per 100' at 1 mph wind?  I'm totally okay with the .7, just having a difficult time understanding the 1% rule.

     

    The grid is not graduated such that going to 5 decimal places is worth the effort..

    The 1% rule was developed by someone else, and I am just repeating it here.

    But, I use it every time I play. VEM notwithstanding, the fact the wind direction and speed is not constant, and hitting the Ding!, I have found it very accurate.

    Try it, and make your own judgement.

     

  • ApexPC
    3,164 Posts
    Tue, Nov 26 2013 10:15 AM

    tigerfan1506:

    So on approach shots, each grid is a 20 ft square?

    The grid is 20 feet square, and the aim point is 10 feet from each side of the square. The grid is 20 feet square regardless where you look at it from.

    If you are on a green, you can be inside the grid and not able to see the entire square.

    Since there are 14 lines between each parallel edge of the square, the distance between each line is 1.43 feet. ( 20 / 14 = 1.4285)

  • alosso
    21,022 Posts
    Tue, Nov 26 2013 11:10 AM

    DaddysKat:
    my question is where did the 1' per 100' of distance (or 1%) come from?  Was it a WAG?
    It's not "wives and girlfriends of the Three Lions squad" you are talking about, is it? *giggles*

    No, not a mere guess but more like a common rule of thumb, given in several variants. Most generally, it's 1 yd per 1 MPH (without a shot distance), and I use "1 yd per MPH over full distance (200 yds)" - 150 % of the rule given above. Can't say which is better.

    Edit seeing your reply below:

    Of course height and trajectory influence the reaction - one area where the Starters are better than others :)

  • DaddysKat
    3,554 Posts
    Tue, Nov 26 2013 11:13 AM

    ApexPC:

    The grid is not graduated such that going to 5 decimal places is worth the effort..

    The 1% rule was developed by someone else, and I am just repeating it here.

     

    Okay ... thanks.  It just didn't make sense, since the club's loft dictates ball flight.  Wind force on a 56 degree wedge will be somewhat stronger than on an 25 degree 5 iron ... and if the shot is "punched" instead of "full" the wind's effect will be less ... so that 1' per 1 mph at 100 yards seemed like a WAG ... just sayin'. 

    Sorry for being so anal ... just working out my approach calculator and the wind deviation.  I'm honestly not knocking the pitch grid.  I also use it to determine where I need to place the shot ... now if only I could hit the ding more, I'd get that distance to the pin a lot closer!

    As they say in golf, "it's not how you drive, it's how you you arrive."  and for me here, "it don't mean a thing if you don't hear that ding .... du bap du bap du bap du bad da do!"  Lol.

  • DaddysKat
    3,554 Posts
    Tue, Nov 26 2013 11:26 AM

    alosso:
    Most generally, it's 1 yd per 1 MPH (without a shot distance), and I use "1 yd per MPH over full distance (200 yds)" - 150 % of the rule given above.

    Wind force on a golf ball is:

                        Force of Wind = Drag Coefficient * Wind speed.

    That's in its simpliest form.  So the "rule of thumb" is more of 'layman's speak'.  I honestly didn't have a clue who came up with that, and try as I may, I can't get my calculations to get there, unless I'm hitting a 64 degree wedge full power ... then I'm close.  Problem is, I can't hit my 64 degree wedge 167 yards.

    I'm good with 'layman's speak' if I'm playing an Alt Shot game!  Just won't use it with my calculator.

    Thanks!  Question answered ... just a WAG rule of thumb.

    WAG = "Wild A$$ed Guess"  lol.

    Edit:  Just saw your edit, Alosso ... Not meaning to offend.  Just trying to get the "x" and "z" components on ball flight based on wind angles.

     

  • alosso
    21,022 Posts
    Tue, Nov 26 2013 12:51 PM

    I found WAG in urbandictionary.com - as #6 behind Posh and friends ;)

    The rule, accurate or not, has been around when I started. There have been more sophisticated thoughts on the subject, but it would spoil my fun to follow them.
    My 2 Pfennig: Experience tells that preciseness is frequently VEMmed, so why bother?

    And, no hard feelings in the air - just trying to add some brainwaves to your thoughts.

    Happy hitting!

  • DaddysKat
    3,554 Posts
    Tue, Nov 26 2013 1:08 PM

    alosso:

    I found WAG in urbandictionary.com - as #6 behind Posh and friends ;)

    The rule, accurate or not, has been around when I started. There have been more sophisticated thoughts on the subject, but it would spoil my fun to follow them.
    My 2 Pfennig: Experience tells that preciseness is frequently VEMmed, so why bother?

    And, no hard feelings in the air - just trying to add some brainwaves to your thoughts.

    Happy hitting!

    Absolutely no worries Alosso!  

    I ran across this article years ago while taking physics in college: Golf Ball Aerodynamics, Aeronautical Quarterly, pgs 112 - 122, May, 1976.

    In this article Bearman and Harvey discuss the physics behind everything relating to ball flight, including side spin.  More importantly, they describe the calculations I will be using with my Approach Calculator. I spent an hour going through boxes of term papers trying to find my essay last night.  Now that I've found it, I'm golden ... and those that use my approach calculator should find themselves within that "3' golden circle" on approach shots dinged! (sans VEM, of course)!

    Kat ♥

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