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announcer

Sat, May 8 2021 12:36 AM (17 replies)
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  • SimonTheBeetle
    2,405 Posts
    Thu, May 6 2021 4:52 PM

    sirromkcaj:
    Could someone please explain to the announcer that the term "Never up, Never in" means that you didn't hit the ball hard enough.....it makes me crazy that when the announcer says it, the put missed long!

    It doesn't bug me whatever he murmurs. What bugs me though is he suggests either a wrong club or a wrong shot type or a wrong scale every single time.

  • Cicero733
    999 Posts
    Thu, May 6 2021 5:47 PM

    I believe the announcer is using a bit of irony. You, the player hit it hard enough to make the hole and beyond. It’s giving you an excuse as to why your putt is long. You tried, but…Perhaps if he began with, “well, you know the old saying, never up, never in” 

  • AussieMick11
    1,223 Posts
    Fri, May 7 2021 10:14 AM

    sirromkcaj:

    Could someone please explain to the announcer that the term "Never up, Never in" means that you didn't hit the ball hard enough.....it makes me crazy that when the announcer says it, the put missed long!

    But the term doesn't only mean "you didn't hit the ball hard enough". A putt that missed long could still be classed as "never up, never in" if the putt missed low. The putt was never high enough so it was never up.

    If it really annoys you, simply go to audio settings and slide the "commentary volume" all the way to the left.

  • Robert1893
    6,796 Posts
    Fri, May 7 2021 10:19 AM

    .

  • borntobesting
    9,211 Posts
    Fri, May 7 2021 10:37 AM

    Actually someone should explain to him that the phrase has to do with putting not approach shots. I don't know how many times my punched 64 degree wedge almost went into the hole for an eagle and I got  "Never up /Never in".

  • bossbird
    1,196 Posts
    Fri, May 7 2021 1:49 PM

    Hahaha I never have the volume switched on , so I don’t hear anything !

  • pdb1
    22,308 Posts
    Fri, May 7 2021 4:16 PM

    sirromkcaj:

    Could someone please explain to the announcer that the term "Never up, Never in" means that you didn't hit the ball hard enough.....it makes me crazy that when the announcer says it, the put missed long!

    alosso:

    dhjam1:
    unless a putt is struck hard enough to reach the hole it has no chance of falling into the cup.
    Continental wisdom is, U.S. (or Austrian(?)) scientists concluded that 96.3 % of short putts won't get into the hole!

    Words of Eternal Wisdom!!

      Another study was done . The results found that 100 % of short putts won't and didn't get into the hole .

    dhjam1:

    Ok guys sorry for putting in my opinion, so let me do exactly what the OP asked for us to do.

     

    Dear Mr. Announcer the OP would like for me to explain to you that term "Never up, Never in" means that you didn't hit the ball hard enough.....So it makes him  crazy  when you say it, when his  putt missed long! Thanks. 

    Maybe .

    AussieMick11:

    But the term doesn't only mean "you didn't hit the ball hard enough". A putt that missed long could still be classed as "never up, never in" if the putt missed low. The putt was never high enough so it was never up.

     

    Maybe .

    AussieMick11:
    If it really annoys you, simply go to audio settings and slide the "commentary volume" all the way to the left.

    Best yet .

    borntobesting:

    Actually someone should explain to him that the phrase has to do with putting not approach shots. I don't know how many times my punched 64 degree wedge almost went into the hole for an eagle and I got  "Never up /Never in".

    Maybe

    bossbird:

    Hahaha I never have the volume switched on , so I don’t hear anything !


    Solution .

  • JockJockson
    880 Posts
    Sat, May 8 2021 12:36 AM

    Before I turned the sound down, this used to piss me off too.

    Until I realized the announcer was making a mournful observation on the performance of his own reproductive organs.

    Cheery

    JJ

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