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J.C Sneed

Thu, Jan 13 2022 10:08 PM (67 replies)
  • Tony08888
    330 Posts
    Mon, May 4 2020 9:42 AM

    Rebellion,

    The only variable is the green speed. The calculations for dot speed, distance, and elevation are the same. Only the green speed changes where the aim point will be. 

    I’ve finally got the method down decently, but am using a much simpler system now. Different calculations than JC Sneed that lead to the same aim point. 

    Send me a PM and I’ll send you the calcs. 

  • Yiannis1970
    2,587 Posts
    Wed, May 6 2020 3:18 AM

    Rebellion27:

    Glad someone mentioned the green speeds! Learning the Sneed way, but surely there has to be a big difference in dot count/aim for a 15ft uphill putt on 9 greens vs the same putt on 13 greens? Any info would be welcome! IS there a specific speed it works best on? Cheers Yiannis

     

    Hello there. A nice way to start (on different green speeds) is by changing your reference number. Break affects less slower greens meanwhile does the opposite on the fast ones. So, if for example our reference number is 6 seconds for tourney greens, we can set up our number to 5,5 seconds for slower greens.

     

  • giraldin
    3,704 Posts
    Wed, May 6 2020 3:37 AM

    I need to continue having information on this thread, so I leave my presence here.

    Thanks to all who leave information here

  • maoriand1
    1,246 Posts
    Thu, May 7 2020 4:43 AM

    i have been trying this jcsneed method and it seems a very good method but it needs to be practiced a lot to understand how to play it.. till there s a method that don t consider the aim on the power we hit we can easily say that everyone should find the best mode to play it and understand the right power to use. i tried it for different days but i don t find a good result because i always hit the putts in different ways. sometime less power..other times i play a bit hard..

     

  • Eyeswideopen11
    107 Posts
    Fri, Jan 22 2021 11:46 AM

    Please see next post.

  • pdiehm
    211 Posts
    Sun, Jan 24 2021 9:35 AM
    Eyeswideopen11:

    I have been using JCSneeds method for over 5 years and I love it.  It's and easier way for me to aim my putts instead of doing all those calculations.  Simply put whatever the distance that you're put is, for example if it is 25 ft, then all you need to do is locate 25 ft on the putting grid drag the triangle to the left or right, depending on the break, and then hit it.  

    Say what? English or an example?
  • Eyeswideopen11
    107 Posts
    Sun, Jan 24 2021 10:47 AM

    These are your words.  Hope it's a better explanation.

    Reading the Breaks: HEART OF THE UPDATE.

    The dots on the grid give it away.

    To make it clearer for everyone, I've revised my description below on how to read the breaks.

    For each putt -Reverse the view to behind the hole looking back at your player avatar. Notice where the closest to the hole dot on the closest to the hole horizontal grid line begins moving. It's always at the center point of the grid closest (left or right) to the hole on the horizontal gridline running through the hole,  right? This dot location is equal to 10 feet of putting length for average speed breaks. Or, you could also say the center point between the first vertical gridline and the hole running along the horizontal gridline closest to the hole or through the hole is equal to 10 feet of putting length for average speed breaks. The first VERTICAL grid line away from the hole equals 15 feet putting length for average speed breaks. So, the center of the next grid over is equal to 20 feet of putting length for average speed breaks. And, the center of the next grid over is equal to 30 feet of putting length for average speed breaks. Etc... 

    If you have a 22 foot putt with average speed breakyou would move your aiming point on the horizontal gridline running through the hole (or on an imaginary horizontal gridline running through the hole, if there isn't a horizontal gridline running through the hole) to the middle of the second grid away from the hole (20 feet), then move it a little bit further away from the hole (22 feet). Since the center of the grid is 20 feet, then the next VERTICAL grid line away from the hole equals 25 feet, so the distance for a 22 foot putt would be just less than halfway between the 20 foot spot and the second VERTICAL grid line (=25 feet putting of length for average speed breaks) away from the hole.

    For a 33 foot putt with average speed break, go the third grid away from the hole aim a little closer to the third VERTICAL grid line (=35 feet of putting length for average speed breaks) away from the hole.

    Knowing this, now you simply move your aiming triangle on the same horizontal plane as the hole (on an imaginary HORIZONTAL grid line that runs through the center of the hole, if there isn't a horizontal gridline running through the hole) to the number of feet your putt needs to travel to go in (the putting length the game says, not the adjusted putting speed you calculated using the putting speed formula detailed above).

    Some breaks are slower and some are faster. A little trial and error and practice will fix this. Some slower breaks are only 1/2 the speed of average speed breaks, so you cut your putting length in half (the putting length the game says, not the adjusted length you calculated using the above putting speed formula) and use it as the target to aim at. So, using the first example above, if you have a 22 foot putt with 1/2 the average speed breakyou would move your aiming point to the middle of the first grid away from the hole (10 feet), the move it a little bit further away from the hole (11 feet). Then putt using the speed you calculated using the putting speed formula above. Sometime it's only 1/4 the average speed break, so you would aim 5 to 6 feet away for that 22 foot putt. Get it?

    For faster breaks, guess what? Yeah, you double the distance and move your aiming point to that amount.

    Or sometimes it's a fraction:

    For some fast breaks instead of doubling the distance, sometimes it's 1.5 or 1.25 or 1.75 times the distance, even triple or quadruple in rare cases.

    You have to watch the speed of the dots and get a feel for what average speed looks like, what double speed looks like, what 1/2 speed looks like, etc...

    Does this work 100% of the time? I honestly don't know. It hasn't failed me yet. You will be amazed how accurate it really is, though. it works well enough to improve your putting game to get you to start getting a feel for putting, drop some lllloooooonnnggg rainbows, and start cutting back on the dreaded 3 putt. For the 100 plus foot snakes, you're on your own.

  • pdiehm
    211 Posts
    Sun, Jan 24 2021 5:21 PM
    Eyeswideopen11:

    These are your words.  Hope it's a better explanation.

    Reading the Breaks: HEART OF THE UPDATE.

    The dots on the grid give it away.

    To make it clearer for everyone, I've revised my description below on how to read the breaks.

    For each putt -Reverse the view to behind the hole looking back at your player avatar. Notice where the closest to the hole dot on the closest to the hole horizontal grid line begins moving. It's always at the center point of the grid closest (left or right) to the hole on the horizontal gridline running through the hole,  right? This dot location is equal to 10 feet of putting length for average speed breaks. Or, you could also say the center point between the first vertical gridline and the hole running along the horizontal gridline closest to the hole or through the hole is equal to 10 feet of putting length for average speed breaks. The first VERTICAL grid line away from the hole equals 15 feet putting length for average speed breaks. So, the center of the next grid over is equal to 20 feet of putting length for average speed breaks. And, the center of the next grid over is equal to 30 feet of putting length for average speed breaks. Etc... 

    If you have a 22 foot putt with average speed breakyou would move your aiming point on the horizontal gridline running through the hole (or on an imaginary horizontal gridline running through the hole, if there isn't a horizontal gridline running through the hole) to the middle of the second grid away from the hole (20 feet), then move it a little bit further away from the hole (22 feet). Since the center of the grid is 20 feet, then the next VERTICAL grid line away from the hole equals 25 feet, so the distance for a 22 foot putt would be just less than halfway between the 20 foot spot and the second VERTICAL grid line (=25 feet putting of length for average speed breaks) away from the hole.

    For a 33 foot putt with average speed break, go the third grid away from the hole aim a little closer to the third VERTICAL grid line (=35 feet of putting length for average speed breaks) away from the hole.

    Knowing this, now you simply move your aiming triangle on the same horizontal plane as the hole (on an imaginary HORIZONTAL grid line that runs through the center of the hole, if there isn't a horizontal gridline running through the hole) to the number of feet your putt needs to travel to go in (the putting length the game says, not the adjusted putting speed you calculated using the putting speed formula detailed above).

    Some breaks are slower and some are faster. A little trial and error and practice will fix this. Some slower breaks are only 1/2 the speed of average speed breaks, so you cut your putting length in half (the putting length the game says, not the adjusted length you calculated using the above putting speed formula) and use it as the target to aim at. So, using the first example above, if you have a 22 foot putt with 1/2 the average speed breakyou would move your aiming point to the middle of the first grid away from the hole (10 feet), the move it a little bit further away from the hole (11 feet). Then putt using the speed you calculated using the putting speed formula above. Sometime it's only 1/4 the average speed break, so you would aim 5 to 6 feet away for that 22 foot putt. Get it?

    For faster breaks, guess what? Yeah, you double the distance and move your aiming point to that amount.

    Or sometimes it's a fraction:

    For some fast breaks instead of doubling the distance, sometimes it's 1.5 or 1.25 or 1.75 times the distance, even triple or quadruple in rare cases.

    You have to watch the speed of the dots and get a feel for what average speed looks like, what double speed looks like, what 1/2 speed looks like, etc...

    Does this work 100% of the time? I honestly don't know. It hasn't failed me yet. You will be amazed how accurate it really is, though. it works well enough to improve your putting game to get you to start getting a feel for putting, drop some lllloooooonnnggg rainbows, and start cutting back on the dreaded 3 putt. For the 100 plus foot snakes, you're on your own.

    My head hurts. I am a mobile only player so perhaps I am having a hard time visualizing. I do know that 99% of the time my reverse isn’t a true reverse and it’s always at an angle, which makes lining up the putts even more difficult because you don’t have a true view. You say it hasn’t failed yet, but you have a 40% one putt and a 1.66 putts per hole....just curious. I think I need to see a video and a talk through. I am definitely a visual learner
  • Eyeswideopen11
    107 Posts
    Mon, Jan 25 2021 7:57 AM

    I'd be happy to help walk you through it.  Let me know.

     

    J

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