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Wind strengths and distance chart...

Sun, Sep 13 2020 7:44 PM (120 replies)
  • BeachedMulligan
    1,238 Posts
    Thu, Sep 20 2012 5:54 AM

    Yep. Gotta be English majors and golfers now. Not just golfers.

    Anyone who complains about Math is in the wrong place. Golf is a huge game of math, it just comes easier to some. 

  • tramilleo
    1,516 Posts
    Thu, Sep 20 2012 6:32 AM

    Lol hated  English 101 by the way lol could some one tell this Legend what is meter tape? And to the OP love when others sincerely try to help others, it is both refreshing and helpful.I have been playing tournament greens for 2 years and about 3 months ago i found a chart in the forums for green speeds  for different increments and while it is not gonna help you make a putt to save your life, it has helped me to better learn my putter. 2 years on tourney greens and they are more of a mystery to me today then they were when i began playing them in September of 2010.And since update on 5/1/12, that  Wgt made tourney greens play at 3 different speeds in between putts.Lol i digress, i still use chart as quick reference before putts but with greens changing from tourney to standard to slow then back to tourney it is turning into a guessing game.Haters are gonna hate always,but shake them off like dust and continue to help when possible

    Weylon

  • YankeeJim
    25,611 Posts
    Thu, Sep 20 2012 6:48 AM

    tramilleo:
    could some one tell this Legend what is meter tape?

    Tape on your monitor that serves like a PutterPal, typically for all clubs, with home made scales, marks, whatever helps. (There's a guy here that swears that's cheating. LOL)

  • BombonicaRGH
    1 Posts
    Fri, Sep 21 2012 11:21 AM

    I never studied English in school buddy, i've learned ed by ear so don't be a smart ass.

  • BeachedMulligan
    1,238 Posts
    Fri, Sep 21 2012 12:47 PM

    YankeeJim:

     (There's a guy here that swears that's cheating. LOL)

    Its a very fine line. Yes they sell a putter pal, but theres many shortcuts to learning distances in this game. Whether its movements, tapes, etc. its here.

  • MBaggese
    15,335 Posts
    Fri, Sep 21 2012 5:47 PM

    BombonicaRGH:

    I never studied English in school buddy, i've learned ed by ear so don't be a smart ass.

    Wrong account?...lol

  • MBaggese
    15,335 Posts
    Fri, Sep 21 2012 5:48 PM

    s0niido:

    Doah.....clearly your IQ is low and your not capable of making simple math :)....+ in time, as you get better, you will make quick moves like in putting, and you will pin point with accuracy the exact yards, that math will be way back in your head, doing it unconsciously.

    Maybe you thought you were on this account...lol

  • MBaggese
    15,335 Posts
    Fri, Sep 21 2012 5:49 PM

    BeachedMulligan:

    Yep. Gotta be English majors and golfers now. Not just golfers.

    Anyone who complains about Math is in the wrong place. Golf is a huge game of math, it just comes easier to some. 

    All in response to the above ...and your only friend:)

     

  • SkuyGuy
    7 Posts
    Sat, Sep 22 2012 9:00 AM

    Hi all,

    I think I have found the right forum to post my math for calculating distances. Are you ready?

     

    The math looks like a lot. I used to do the calculations on a handheld calculator. I finally wised up and built an 

     

    excel spreadsheet where I just type in the data and get the answer. This is the distance formula as explained below:

     

    distance to hit = d + w*(d/210)*sin(A) + 0.4 * e + {d/(bs+ 0.14*e)}/{1+(w/20)*BB}

     

    ***************************

     

    Explanation

    ___________

     

    There are four "terms" involved:

     

    1. "d" is the distance shown to the hole.

     

    2. "w*(d/210)*sin(A)" is the amount of yardage to compensate for the wind against or with you. A negative angle, 

     

    tailwind, subtracts yardage and a positive angle adds. More explained below.

     

    3. "0.4 * e" adds or subtracts yardage from the strike due to elevation. A negative elevation subtracts yardage and a 

     

    postive one adds.

     

    4. "{d/(bs+ 0.14*e)}/{1+(w/20)*BB}"  When using backspin yardage needs to be added. This term is explained in detail 

     

    below.

     

     

    In its most basic form it does not calculate for backspin:

     

     

    distance to hit = d + w*(d/210)*sin(A) + 0.4 * e

     

    where:

     

    d = The distance to target in yards.

     

    w = windspeed.

     

    e = elevation in feet

     

    210. This means that at 210 yards the wind strength against you knocks off 1 yard for every 1 mph. So if you are at 

     

    105 yards it only knocks off about 1/2 yard per mph. Wgt varies this a bit but I use 210 right now, it seems to vary 

     

    between 190 and 270. Also, changing this values has little affect on overall outcome, but its necassary to get within 

     

    a few yards on your strike.

     

    e = elevation. I use 0.4. This adds or subtracts yardage to the hit according to elevation change. 0.4 seems to be 

     

    perfect and constant.

     

    A = the angle of the wind. If it is against you use 90 degrees, and for pure tailwind use -90 degrees. Pure crosswind 

     

    is 0 degrees, etc. The wind vector that affects the balls travel distance is the sine of the angle. For the wind 

     

    vector that affects the lateral movement of the ball, how much the ball gets pushed sideways, I use the cosine of the 

     

    angle.

     

    Using full backspin requires adding yardage to your strike. To do this I have found that each club (and ball!) has a 

     

    characteristic number to divide the distance, d, by. It varies from club to club. For wedges I typically use between 6 

     

    to 8 yards, and for irons it varies from 13 to 68 from small yardage to large yardage irons.  For example, if the 

     

    distance to the hole is 100 yards, then divide 100 by 6.75 or 100/6.75 = 14.8 yards. The new equation looks like this:

     

    distance to hit = d + w*(d/210)*sin(A) + 0.4 * e + d/bs

     

    where:

    bs = the backspin divisor for the club in use.You will have to experiment with this number. To start, for high degree 

     

    wedges (like 52, 60, 64 Clevelands) I use about 8. 

     

    *On a side note my Cleveland 60 deg 80 yard wedge has so much backspin I don not use it at all and hence dont use the 

     

    d/bs part, so the formula is simpler.

     

    This does get the distance closer and allows for using the full backspin confidently. However, elevation effects the 

     

    balls ability. This can be compensated for. The new part of that formula becomes:

     

    d/(bs+0.14*e)

     

    This has the affect of decreasing the added yardage for higher elevations and increasing the added yardage for lower 

     

    elevations. 0.14 seems to be the right value to use. The new formula becomes:

     

    distance to hit = d + w*(d/210)*sin(A) + 0.4 * e + d/(bs+ 0.14*e)

     

    Added backspin distance is also, unfortunately, effected by the direction of the wind. Into the wind and the ball 

     

    bites best, while with a strong tailwind it bites the least. To compensate for this effect the whole term d/(bs+ 

     

    0.14*e) can be divided another number that is dependent upon the wind angle. If pure headwind, dividing the term by 1 

     

    has no affect, and with pure tailwind dividing by 2 seems to have the best result. The new formula becomes:

     

    distance to hit = d + w*(d/210)*sin(A) + 0.4 * e + {d/(bs+ 0.14*e)}/AA

     

    where AA is a number dependant on wind angle. The numbers I use for AA for 90 degrees is:

     

    1 (pure headwind). For other angles use:

    80 deg = 1.06

    70 = 1.12

    60 = 1.17

    50 = 1.23

    40 = 1.31

    30 = 1.33

    20 = 1.37

    10 = 1.385

     0 = 1.4  (pure crosswind)

    -10 = 1.576

    -20 = 1.752

    -30 = 1.928

    -40 = 1.104

    -50 = 1.28

    -60 = 1.456

    -70 = 1.632

    -80 = 1.81

    -90 = 2.0   (pure tailwind)

     

    This gets it even closer. However, wind speed affects these numbers. It seems most accurate for 20 mph. A stronger or 

     

    lighter wind makes it act different. To compensate for this modify the backspin distance formula divisor AA to be 

     

    equal to  AA = 1 + (1 - AA)*(w/20). For a wind stronger than 20 mph this has the affect of decreasing the yards added 

     

    for backspin, with the largest effect for pure tailwind all the way to no effect for pure headwind, which is how the 

     

    ball acts when played. For a lighter wind than 20 mph it has the effect of adding more yards, even with a tailwind. 

     

    For no wind the term d/(bs+0.14*e) is simply divided by 1, having no effect, which models the scenario well. If we 

     

    call AA AAA andsomething like BB and consider the (1-AA) term, a new and simpler formula can be divised. Here are the 

     

    new values for BB:

     

    BB for 90 deg = 0, or for:

    80 = 0.06

    70 = 0.12

    60 = 0.17

    50 = 0.23

    40 = 0.31

    30 = 0.33

    20 = 0.37

    10 = 0.385

    0 = 0.4  

    -10 = 0.576

    -20 = 0.752

    -30 = 0.928

    -40 = 0.104

    -50 = 0.28

    -60 = 0.456

    -70 = 0.632

    -80 = 0.81

    -90 = 1.0   

     

    The new formula becomes:

     

    distance to hit = d + w*(d/210)*sin(A) + 0.4 * e + {d/(bs+ 0.14*e)}/{1+(w/20)*BB}

     

     

     

    Best of luck!

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • SkuyGuy
    7 Posts
    Sat, Sep 22 2012 9:00 AM

    Hi all,

    I think I have found the right forum to post my math for calculating distances. Are you ready?

     

     

    The math looks like a lot. I used to do the calculations on a handheld calculator. I finally wised up and built an 

     

    excel spreadsheet where I just type in the data and get the answer. This is the distance formula as explained below:

     

    distance to hit = d + w*(d/210)*sin(A) + 0.4 * e + {d/(bs+ 0.14*e)}/{1+(w/20)*BB}

     

    ***************************

     

    Explanation

    ___________

     

    There are four "terms" involved:

     

    1. "d" is the distance shown to the hole.

     

    2. "w*(d/210)*sin(A)" is the amount of yardage to compensate for the wind against or with you. A negative angle, 

     

    tailwind, subtracts yardage and a positive angle adds. More explained below.

     

    3. "0.4 * e" adds or subtracts yardage from the strike due to elevation. A negative elevation subtracts yardage and a 

     

    postive one adds.

     

    4. "{d/(bs+ 0.14*e)}/{1+(w/20)*BB}"  When using backspin yardage needs to be added. This term is explained in detail 

     

    below.

     

     

    In its most basic form it does not calculate for backspin:

     

     

    distance to hit = d + w*(d/210)*sin(A) + 0.4 * e

     

    where:

     

    d = The distance to target in yards.

     

    w = windspeed.

     

    e = elevation in feet

     

    210. This means that at 210 yards the wind strength against you knocks off 1 yard for every 1 mph. So if you are at 

     

    105 yards it only knocks off about 1/2 yard per mph. Wgt varies this a bit but I use 210 right now, it seems to vary 

     

    between 190 and 270. Also, changing this values has little affect on overall outcome, but its necassary to get within 

     

    a few yards on your strike.

     

    e = elevation. I use 0.4. This adds or subtracts yardage to the hit according to elevation change. 0.4 seems to be 

     

    perfect and constant.

     

    A = the angle of the wind. If it is against you use 90 degrees, and for pure tailwind use -90 degrees. Pure crosswind 

     

    is 0 degrees, etc. The wind vector that affects the balls travel distance is the sine of the angle. For the wind 

     

    vector that affects the lateral movement of the ball, how much the ball gets pushed sideways, I use the cosine of the 

     

    angle.

     

    Using full backspin requires adding yardage to your strike. To do this I have found that each club (and ball!) has a 

     

    characteristic number to divide the distance, d, by. It varies from club to club. For wedges I typically use between 6 

     

    to 8 yards, and for irons it varies from 13 to 68 from small yardage to large yardage irons.  For example, if the 

     

    distance to the hole is 100 yards, then divide 100 by 6.75 or 100/6.75 = 14.8 yards. The new equation looks like this:

     

    distance to hit = d + w*(d/210)*sin(A) + 0.4 * e + d/bs

     

    where:

    bs = the backspin divisor for the club in use.You will have to experiment with this number. To start, for high degree 

     

    wedges (like 52, 60, 64 Clevelands) I use about 8. 

     

    *On a side note my Cleveland 60 deg 80 yard wedge has so much backspin I don not use it at all and hence dont use the 

     

    d/bs part, so the formula is simpler.

     

    This does get the distance closer and allows for using the full backspin confidently. However, elevation effects the 

     

    balls ability. This can be compensated for. The new part of that formula becomes:

     

    d/(bs+0.14*e)

     

    This has the affect of decreasing the added yardage for higher elevations and increasing the added yardage for lower 

     

    elevations. 0.14 seems to be the right value to use. The new formula becomes:

     

    distance to hit = d + w*(d/210)*sin(A) + 0.4 * e + d/(bs+ 0.14*e)

     

    Added backspin distance is also, unfortunately, effected by the direction of the wind. Into the wind and the ball 

     

    bites best, while with a strong tailwind it bites the least. To compensate for this effect the whole term d/(bs+ 

     

    0.14*e) can be divided another number that is dependent upon the wind angle. If pure headwind, dividing the term by 1 

     

    has no affect, and with pure tailwind dividing by 2 seems to have the best result. The new formula becomes:

     

    distance to hit = d + w*(d/210)*sin(A) + 0.4 * e + {d/(bs+ 0.14*e)}/AA

     

    where AA is a number dependant on wind angle. The numbers I use for AA for 90 degrees is:

     

    1 (pure headwind). For other angles use:

    80 deg = 1.06

    70 = 1.12

    60 = 1.17

    50 = 1.23

    40 = 1.31

    30 = 1.33

    20 = 1.37

    10 = 1.385

     0 = 1.4  (pure crosswind)

    -10 = 1.576

    -20 = 1.752

    -30 = 1.928

    -40 = 1.104

    -50 = 1.28

    -60 = 1.456

    -70 = 1.632

    -80 = 1.81

    -90 = 2.0   (pure tailwind)

     

    This gets it even closer. However, wind speed affects these numbers. It seems most accurate for 20 mph. A stronger or 

     

    lighter wind makes it act different. To compensate for this modify the backspin distance formula divisor AA to be 

     

    equal to  AA = 1 + (1 - AA)*(w/20). For a wind stronger than 20 mph this has the affect of decreasing the yards added 

     

    for backspin, with the largest effect for pure tailwind all the way to no effect for pure headwind, which is how the 

     

    ball acts when played. For a lighter wind than 20 mph it has the effect of adding more yards, even with a tailwind. 

     

    For no wind the term d/(bs+0.14*e) is simply divided by 1, having no effect, which models the scenario well. If we 

     

    call AA AAA andsomething like BB and consider the (1-AA) term, a new and simpler formula can be divised. Here are the 

     

    new values for BB:

     

    BB for 90 deg = 0, or for:

    80 = 0.06

    70 = 0.12

    60 = 0.17

    50 = 0.23

    40 = 0.31

    30 = 0.33

    20 = 0.37

    10 = 0.385

    0 = 0.4  

    -10 = 0.576

    -20 = 0.752

    -30 = 0.928

    -40 = 0.104

    -50 = 0.28

    -60 = 0.456

    -70 = 0.632

    -80 = 0.81

    -90 = 1.0   

     

    The new formula becomes:

     

    distance to hit = d + w*(d/210)*sin(A) + 0.4 * e + {d/(bs+ 0.14*e)}/{1+(w/20)*BB}

     

     

     

    Best of luck!

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

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