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Eliminate wedges on greens

Wed, Oct 3 2018 5:27 AM (141 replies)
  • Tigerpaw509
    1,285 Posts
    Fri, Aug 31 2018 3:03 PM

    Its in the game but Thx in advance for myself and the others in the Group.

     

  • Robert1893
    7,256 Posts
    Fri, Aug 31 2018 3:49 PM

    Luckystar5:
    Just another thought, how is disrespecting another player by quitting, in any way,  in the spirit, of anything, other than poor sportsmanship? 

    +1

  • santa084
    114 Posts
    Fri, Aug 31 2018 6:32 PM

    When I first started playing I tried a chip shot from the green.it gave a stroke penalty. Saying illegal club shot. Then I notice for green in regulation landing on the Fringe don't count. So I may or not chip from there. no penalty

  • JFidanza
    1,676 Posts
    Fri, Aug 31 2018 8:11 PM

    'If you can't dance, don't blame the dance floor.'

  • alosso
    20,739 Posts
    Fri, Aug 31 2018 9:36 PM

    Luckystar5:
    I'm a little confused, some people keep using the term " spirit of the game" , " not what golf is about"  etc.  Just out of curiosity can anyone explain how these terms fit into this conversation?   Golf is defined, as a game , played on a large open air course, in which a small hard ball is struck with a club, into a series of small holes in the ground.  The object being to use the fewest possible strokes, to complete the course. 
    I agree to the latter.

    Next, there is the official definition

    Rules of Golf:
    The Spirit of the Game

    Golf is played, for the most part, without the supervision of a referee or umpire. The game relies on the integrity of the individual to show consideration for other players and to abide by the Rules. All players should conduct themselves in a disciplined manner, demonstrating courtesy and sportsmanship at all times, irrespective of how competitive they may be. This is the spirit of the game of golf.

    To me, the spirit is all about gentlemanlike behaviour, as highlighted. It does not include some "religious" beliefs like said "no-cheat cheat" preconception.

  • Luckystar5
    1,613 Posts
    Sat, Sep 1 2018 9:24 AM

    alosso:

    Luckystar5:
    I'm a little confused, some people keep using the term " spirit of the game" , " not what golf is about"  etc.  Just out of curiosity can anyone explain how these terms fit into this conversation?   Golf is defined, as a game , played on a large open air course, in which a small hard ball is struck with a club, into a series of small holes in the ground.  The object being to use the fewest possible strokes, to complete the course. 
    I agree to the latter.

    Next, there is the official definition

    Rules of Golf:
    The Spirit of the Game

    Golf is played, for the most part, without the supervision of a referee or umpire. The game relies on the integrity of the individual to show consideration for other players and to abide by the Rules. All players should conduct themselves in a disciplined manner, demonstrating courtesy and sportsmanship at all times, irrespective of how competitive they may be. This is the spirit of the game of golf.

    To me, the spirit is all about gentlemanlike behaviour, as highlighted. It does not include some "religious" beliefs like said "no-cheat cheat" preconception.

    So, with what the definition of "spirit of the game"  simply states is that you need to be honest enough to follow the rules!  All else is left up to interpretation,  your ideals of what integrity,  discipline,  courtesy,  and sportsmanship are,  may be completely different than someone elses!  So with that, who's to say which persons ideals prevail?  Just so long as you don't break a rule. 

  • ScottyAKing
    152 Posts
    Sun, Sep 2 2018 7:41 PM

    I’m finding this is becoming more prevalent, and to be honest, it is really annoying. 

    I know some of the advocates of the practice here are real world golfers too.  So, how many of you would even consider doing this in competition?  This includes pennant, rep, club tourney, or even your weekly chicken run.

    Apart from risking a bollocking from the clerk of the course, or worse, being chased down and run over by an irate greenkeeper on his mower, how do you think it would be received by either your competitors, or fellow team/club members?  There’s a fair chance once word got around that you’d be out of favour pretty quickly, and struggle to find someone to share a bevy with on the 19th.  Perhaps none of this bothers you, but exactly who does it say more about?

    Some have said it’s just a computer game.  Where, in essence is true I guess, as it can never exactly replicate the real world.  However, on a personal note, this is my actual golfing experience these days.  Due to a spinal injury after a skiing accident some years ago, I’m unable to get out and enjoy dragging my cart around, smelling the fresh cut grass on an early morning round soon after the greenkeeper had done the daily trim, or swearing (mutedly of course) when I sliced my first drive of the day into the lake!  Man I hated that piece of water!  I could write a whole list of stuff, but I don’t want it to look like I’m having a pity party....  The point I’m trying to make is, I like to treat the game, and my opponents with the respect I did when I was out with the sun on my face.  Is it too much of a stretch to ask the same?

    My take.  Feel free to tee off....

  • alosso
    20,739 Posts
    Mon, Sep 3 2018 1:04 AM

    ScottyAKing:
    I know some of the advocates of the practice here are real world golfers too.  So, how many of you would even consider doing this in competition?
    Here!
    I would certainly not do it in a casual round, and not by cockiness, but I did it, once.

    In a tournament, I found myself on the wrong side of a 40 m green, playing uphill. Played the chip but blew it due to the hard surface of the green. Maybe still a three-putt to hole out :(

    Not a bad word by any of the competitors, no consequences by the club. In review, I stand by my decision but I should have practiced it. THAT would certainly be frivolous.

    I explained my view earlier in this thread. It's by the rules, it does no harm, and WGT even programmed it to work (and they reviewed it by excluding backspin at some time, thus confirming it).

    So, where is any respect missing when some do it here or when I did it considerately in a special situation on a real green?

    If you choose not to use this legit shot, you're welcome. But please give the others the right to decide on their own, and don't judge on them!

    No comment to your fear-mongering trash talk about purported consequences.

  • ScottyAKing
    152 Posts
    Mon, Sep 3 2018 2:15 AM

    A 40m up hill putt isn’t a special situation.  Your approach wasn’t good enough, you obviously didn’t think you had the ability to read the green at that distance (no shame in that.  Only the very good, or very lucky can), so took the easy way out, which didn’t work anyway.  Also, you say you played a chip.  On here, playing a chip on the green is useless from any distance (yes I tested it out on the practice green.  I like to get my facts straight).  You use the full swing option, so it’s not the same as what you attempted.  Would you take a full swing on the green with a wedge?

    I would class a special situation as having a substantial obstacle in your way, for example Mickelson’s flop shown earlier in the thread. 

    Now, I’m about to indulge in a dram of whisky, and I make a point of not mixing alcohol and keyboards. :)

  • alosso
    20,739 Posts
    Mon, Sep 3 2018 4:12 AM

    It needs not to be special as you describe Phil's use, it only needs to be legitimate.

    My decision to chip was legitimate in every aspect and caused none of the predicted negative consequences. Today, with more experience, I might make a different decision.

    The main difference here is that you do absolutely no harm (except for those who aren't skilled).

     

    Cheers to you - your luck today to be ahead in the day. Here, it's noon and no-drinks office time.

     

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