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Uneven lies...

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Wed, Dec 26 2012 8:40 PM by chris5214. 23 replies.
  • Teedaawg United States
    276 Posts
    Wed, Dec 26 2012 12:22 AM

    Can anyone enlighten us a bit on any formulas/aim or tid-bits for how to play these uneven lies??? I played around a bit on them but need some serious assistance!!!

    Tee

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  • SeabrookFlash United States
    421 Posts
    Wed, Dec 26 2012 4:40 AM

    And I thought it was just me. Any help will be appreciated.  Otherwise I will continue to not use this feature.

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  • PJSnumber1 United States
    2 Posts
    Wed, Dec 26 2012 5:37 AM

    It's the game the thing i not programmed properly.  When it says there is a six inch downslope and you judge for that then the ball only goes two inches down there is nothing you can do but hope one day the programmers will get it right.

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  • borntobesting United States
    8,077 Posts
    Wed, Dec 26 2012 5:50 AM

    Me too. But it is still experimental and not working quite right yet. I just hope when they hold the new uneven lie tournaments next week they will be closer to being right.

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  • Woodoworkery United States
    3,394 Posts
    Wed, Dec 26 2012 6:10 AM

    Just remember ball below your feet , aim left, ball above your feet aim right, and always add extra yardage if the ball is down hill or up hill.

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  • YankeeJim United States
    24,386 Posts
    Wed, Dec 26 2012 6:30 AM

    Look up CerinoDevoti, he has been all over this feature since it came out.

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  • CerinoDevoti United States
    3,198 Posts
    Wed, Dec 26 2012 6:35 AM

    Think about it like starting WGT all over again. There were no ready formulas to read and be successful. You have to play it a lot and make your own mental notes of angles. I played the unevens from the first day they brought it out in it's older form. Loved it straight away. I put the starter clubs and ball in my bag and re-learned the game as if I was a new member. Once I got used to the offset  angles you have to aim at, I slowly put my better clubs in play and worked like crazy to get a natural feel of it. Bottom line, don't wait thinking it'll get easier in the future, play it now in practice mode.

    P.S. If you don't want to try it with the starter clubs, use the starter ball anyway. That way if you hit it into the woods or lakes, it doesn't cost you anything while learning. Some shots you're aiming at the trees or straight at bunkers to offset the ground lie, just hit it and see what happens.

    P.S.#2. Courses like Oakmont and Olympic were designed and built some time ago. They play perfectly into the uneven lie game. Quite a few holes will have a left pin position when the ground produces a draw. Same with right side pins when the ground produces a fade. After a while you'll start searching for the lie you want when hitting your tee shot. The only way to produce great scoring is to learn the geography of the fairways. Watch closely how your tee shots finish rolling out. Lots of folks have complained that the uneven lies shouldn't have been introduced until a draw or fade option was already available. From my observations we really don't need it. Playing the courses as they were designed will produce the draws and fades it takes to hit close to the pins. Each course has a few opposite holes that don't match draw/fade  fairway lies to the pin position. That's a hole you have to accept par and move on. These are Open Championship Courses after all.

    Have fun, chin up and accept what happens. After a while it all becomes as natural as playing flatland lies.

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  • Corwyn United States
    2,408 Posts
    Wed, Dec 26 2012 6:39 AM

    Yup, Cerino sure is an expert on Unevens! Check out some of the replays in his blog. And I'm sure he'll chip in here.

    Here are some thoughts I posted in another thread yesterday:

    Corwyn:

    The [existing thread] with the most helpful info is probably this one: 

    http://www.wgt.com/forums/t/124818.aspx?PageIndex=25

    and I'm deliberately sending you to the last pages of the thread (the beginning is full of everyone's initial reactions within the first few days of its release).

    There is also some strategy and tips in the thread of this community tourney I ran in the fall (but the nuggets are a bit spread out I'm afraid).

    Do note that Uneven Lies was toned down in a major way in 2nd week of October as part of the monthly WGT update, so the effects that are discussed in the first thread are not nearly as extreme.

    Playing Unevens successfully is as much about sensible course management as anything else. When you get into trouble, play out of it, rather than attempt anything heroic.

    I found the best way to learn Unevens was with Starter Clubs and balls, and to make Par my goal. After all, we all learned how to play the game in the first place with Starters, so it makes sense to go back to the source. Once you get a handle on it, introduce it to your play with the 'fancy clubs'.

    I believe Uneven Lies may well be the best thing that has happened to this game. I hope you persist with it, and learn to love it too!

    Good luck!

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  • YankeeJim United States
    24,386 Posts
    Wed, Dec 26 2012 6:44 AM

    Corwyn:
    I found the best way to learn Unevens was with Starter Clubs and balls,

    CD also espouses this and I'm curious as to why. If you know your current clubs really well would you be making it more difficult by using them straight away? I understand the risk about losing the ball while you're learning but when they're only 22-40 credits each that factors out.

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  • Corwyn United States
    2,408 Posts
    Wed, Dec 26 2012 6:55 AM

    Hey Cerino! You did chip in (while I was typing!).

    CerinoDevoti:
    P.S.#2. Courses like Oakmont and Olympic were designed and built some time ago. They play perfectly into the uneven lie game. Quite a few holes will have a left pin position when the ground produces a draw. Same with right side pins when the ground produces a fade. After a while you'll start searching for the lie you want when hitting your tee shot. The only way to produce great scoring is to learn the geography of the fairways. Watch closely how your tee shots finish rolling out. Lots of folks have complained that the uneven lies shouldn't have been introduced until a draw or fade option was already available. From my observations we really don't need it. Playing the courses as they were designed will produce the draws and fades it takes to hit close to the pins. Each course has a few opposite holes that don't match draw/fade  fairway lies to the pin position. That's a hole you have to accept par and move on. These are Open Championship Courses after all.

    I couldn't agree more with these thoughts! One of the reasons Unevens is so great is that it allows you to appreciate the architecture of these great courses. And that it makes every shot one you need to think about: planning your route to the green from the tee is something the pros have to do: it's good to have that forced on us here too, rather than just blasting 'the big dog' off down the fairway to have it roll and bump along through hill and dale, and end up in a perfectly flat, artificial lie.

    On the subject of draw/fade, I've found that deliberately missing the ding left or right (by a little) against the slope adds a significant degree of control to the shot. In particular, I would aim to do this any time the wind and the slope were likely to guide the shot the same way. (If you miss the ding with the slope/wind in these circumstances, you'll see your shot go way off)

    I looked at the leaderboard of the Tour Legend Uneven Invitational yesterday and noticed that the majority of the players were shooting only 3-5 strokes worse than their average. That may have something to do with BPB being a fairly easy Unevens course, but I think it also indicates that once you take the plunge and get a handle on this feature, it's not that hard. I don't think it's going to radically alter people's scoring, but it could help bring scores a little bit closer to reality.

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